Imputed and imparted righteousness.

Started by Yitzchak, February 12, 2014, 09:33:27 AM

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Yitzchak

     I posted this subject on the other forums a while back. It sounds like heavy Theology , but the concepts are very practical and down to earth. It is a subject that has been debated for the past two thousand years in church circles.

  The basic issue is one of sanctification in the here and now here on earth.

imputed righteousness defined...
QuoteImputed righteousness is a concept in Christian theology that proposes that the "righteousness of Christ ... is imputed to [believers] -- that is, treated as if it were theirs through faith." It is on the basis of this "alien" (i.e. from the outside) righteousness that God accepts humans. This acceptance is also referred to as justification. Thus this doctrine is practically synonymous with justification by faith.


Imparted righteousness defined....
Quoteimparted righteousness is what God does in Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit after justification, working in the Christian to enable and empower the process of sanctification



  Now it may take a minute to sink in. But the basic idea is that imputed righteousness is from the outside. meaning that Christ is our substitute. Imparted righteousness has to do with Christ living through us to enable us to live a holy life.

    I think both are true. If we only have imputed righteousness and no imparted righteousness then we have Christ as a covering for our sins , but we continue to live a sinful life even after being saved. If we have imparted righteousness , then we see a change in our living after salvation most of the time known as sanctification.

     Feel free to post openly about this. It is possible that different people see this issue differently. The church that I was saved in taught imparted righteousness and really emphasized sanctification. But not everyone had that kind of training in their church back round.

     My position is that almost everyone believes in a measure of sanctification. Just make an extreme enough example of a believer living in extreme sinfulness and something in us objects to that. In other words , it is easier to justify living without sanctification if the sins are an addiction to junk food and pepsi versus a Christian rapist or serial killer. If we say that the extremes need to be repented of , then why not repent of all sinful things in our lives ?

    But I also see that we are justified by grace through faith. It is imputed righteousness that justifies us. Not imparted righteousness. :)

 


   
To know him and to make him known

Pete

I believe that both are correct.

When we are saved, righteousness is imputed into us. We do nothing to "deserve" or "earn" it. It is a free gift from God made possible entirely because of the sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

From that moment forward until the day we leave this earth, we are being sanctified. We are being transformed more and more into the image of the Father as He molds us and breaks away anything that is not of Him. I believe this is a lifelong process. However, we are no more saved because of this.

I equate it to a natural relationship between a son (or daughter) and his father. From the day that child is born, he is a part of the family. He will forever be his father's son, and nothing he does will change that. However, it is the parent's responsibility to train the child, discipline him, teach him right from wrong, correct him, encourage him... this never ends. As parents do this, the child matures and eventually reaches a point where he desires to do things that will please his parents. It's no longer something the child has to do at that point, but something that he wants to do, because he loves his parent. Even after the child has grown and becomes a father himself, he is still his father's son.

Nothing that child does or does not do does not change the fact that he is part of the family.

So it is with salvation and sanctification. I believe that we are made righteous by the sacrifice of Christ, but we are sanctified and made holy as part of a lifelong process.

O0
"There is no charge for awesomeness -- or attractiveness."

DiscipleHeLovesToo

my thinking on this is somewhat different.  first of all, i see 'sin' as unbelief (either through ignorance, wrong teaching, or prideful refusal to agree with God about something when we understand His instruction about that something) and 'sins' as the wrong words and actions that result from the one core sin of unbelief.  so from God's perspective, there are no 'big' sins, because all wrong words and actions have been paid for by Jesus - from His perspective there is no difference between telling a white lie and murder - both are paid for and both are just as potentially deadly because their common root is unbelief; we don't see the relationship between white lies and death as readily as we see it with murder; but unbelief separates us from God in that area of our lives, and if the unbelief is prideful refusal to agree with God about something when we understand His instruction about that something, this can lead to total rejection of God and eternal death; whether it is about white lies or murder.  of course if the unbelief is ignorance or wrong teaching, we get mercy (Romans 4:15) until such time as we have received instruction - if we don't receive that instruction in this life, we receive eternal mercy for our wrong thinking in this life that's due to ignorance or wrong teaching (which is essentially the same thing); and receive instruction in the next life.


to me, spiritual rebirth is not a second, third, fourth, etc. chance to 'get it right'; it is not a changed life at all - it is an exchanged life in which we rest from our efforts to keep the law that we are aware of and strive instead to be led by God in all things.  the most common misconception in Christianity IMO is that we can understand how to apply God's laws in every situation to begin with - only He can do this, and when we try we fall from grace in that we are relying on our own understanding and are not relying on His situational leading - in effect we have left fellowship with Him when we strive to achieve outward righteousnessas a goal.  the example of the disciples plucking ears of corn to eat on the sabbath (Mat 12:1) is a great example - Jesus says that 'the Son of Man is Lord even of the sabbath day' - and He did only those things He was led to do by God as our example ('Son of Man' versus 'Son of God').


to focus on improving our outward performance (versus focus on being led by Him in each situation) is to ignore scripture (Jer 10;23; Psalms 37:23; Rom 8:14) and is actually sin (unbelief); but if we strive instead to be led by God using scripture to confirm His leading, we will see improved outward performance as an effortless consequence to the extent by which we are led by God.

so since God will never lead us contrary to His word, as we are led by Him, we attain outward righteousness in that area - but this is not righteousness due to our improved actions, but rather due to our belief in the rightness of His leading - so that all true righteousness is of God; whether imparted or imputed.  scripture is given for instruction in righteousness, but not so that we can get it right more effectively, but so that we can recognize His leading as the Holy Spirit brings scripture to our remembrance ('doctrine', 'reproof' and 'correction').
Joh 17:3  And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.

Foadle

Dana posted on this topic some time ago (I believe it was here but may have been in my CF days).  It was very well done.

Yitzchak

Quote from: DiscipleHeLovesToo on February 16, 2014, 12:46:14 PM
my thinking on this is somewhat different.  first of all, i see 'sin' as unbelief (either through ignorance, wrong teaching, or prideful refusal to agree with God about something when we understand His instruction about that something) and 'sins' as the wrong words and actions that result from the one core sin of unbelief.  so from God's perspective, there are no 'big' sins, because all wrong words and actions have been paid for by Jesus - from His perspective there is no difference between telling a white lie and murder - both are paid for and both are just as potentially deadly because their common root is unbelief; we don't see the relationship between white lies and death as readily as we see it with murder; but unbelief separates us from God in that area of our lives, and if the unbelief is prideful refusal to agree with God about something when we understand His instruction about that something, this can lead to total rejection of God and eternal death; whether it is about white lies or murder.  of course if the unbelief is ignorance or wrong teaching, we get mercy (Romans 4:15) until such time as we have received instruction - if we don't receive that instruction in this life, we receive eternal mercy for our wrong thinking in this life that's due to ignorance or wrong teaching (which is essentially the same thing); and receive instruction in the next life.


to me, spiritual rebirth is not a second, third, fourth, etc. chance to 'get it right'; it is not a changed life at all - it is an exchanged life in which we rest from our efforts to keep the law that we are aware of and strive instead to be led by God in all things.  the most common misconception in Christianity IMO is that we can understand how to apply God's laws in every situation to begin with - only He can do this, and when we try we fall from grace in that we are relying on our own understanding and are not relying on His situational leading - in effect we have left fellowship with Him when we strive to achieve outward righteousnessas a goal.  the example of the disciples plucking ears of corn to eat on the sabbath (Mat 12:1) is a great example - Jesus says that 'the Son of Man is Lord even of the sabbath day' - and He did only those things He was led to do by God as our example ('Son of Man' versus 'Son of God').


to focus on improving our outward performance (versus focus on being led by Him in each situation) is to ignore scripture (Jer 10;23; Psalms 37:23; Rom 8:14) and is actually sin (unbelief); but if we strive instead to be led by God using scripture to confirm His leading, we will see improved outward performance as an effortless consequence to the extent by which we are led by God.

so since God will never lead us contrary to His word, as we are led by Him, we attain outward righteousness in that area - but this is not righteousness due to our improved actions, but rather due to our belief in the rightness of His leading - so that all true righteousness is of God; whether imparted or imputed.  scripture is given for instruction in righteousness, but not so that we can get it right more effectively, but so that we can recognize His leading as the Holy Spirit brings scripture to our remembrance ('doctrine', 'reproof' and 'correction').



  I definitely agree with much of this. I might agree with all of it. I have to think about some parts.

      I think that sanctification is a work of faith just as much as justification is.
To know him and to make him known

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