January 23, 2021, 01:57:38 am

Acts 20:6-7

Started by Tallen, February 09, 2012, 12:47:10 pm

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Tallen

Note the bolded part in these verses.

And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days. And upon the first [day] of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.  (Acts 20:6-7, KJV)

I was studying about the time line of Messiah's crucifixion the other day, considering the arguments about when He was in the grave.  Some say Friday evening to Sunday morning, some say Thursday evening to Sunday morning, and some say Wednesday evening to Saturday evening.  Anyway, I was considering whether or not the last option was a better option than the first.  In the first argument Friday evening to Sunday morning, it was asserted that the idea of three days and three nights is a Hebraism and means any part of three days.  Therefore three days and nights, like it is mentioned in Matthew:

For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.  (Matthew 12:40, KJV)

Really doesn't mean three days and nights, but any part of three days and nights.  The argument continued that is why the disciples were meeting on the first day of the week in Acts 20, as they had changed the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday.

OK, I thought, I'll check out the Greek to see if that was the case.  So I did.

Immediately red flags went up and I saw a huge problem.  In the first part of the 7th verse in Acts 20 the Greek says, en de th mia twn sabbatwn (Gr. εν δε τη μια των σαββατων), which isn't "upon the first of the week".  Note, especially, mia twn sabbatwn.  In the Greek, like in English, there are three kinds of numbers; cardinal, ordinate and nominal.  We are interested in the first two kinds of numbers, cardinal and ordinate.  A cardinal number is a counting number, as in one, two, three, four, five, ect.  An ordinate number is a number used to tell the order of things, first, second, third, fourth, fifth, ect.  The Greek word mia is a cardinal number meaning, one.  Not an ordinate number meaning first.  Now note the word sabbatwm, which is the word sabbath, and should not be "day of the week".  This is also the plural, meaning sabbaths.  This is extremely important in understanding what the Apostle is writing here.

I'll explain.

The disciples had just observed the Days of Unleavened Bread, as mentioned in verse 6.  Then they were to have First Fruits, where the Priest would give a wave offering, then they were to count seven sabbaths and have Pentecost.  So you have the order of things as we are told in the Torah.  Passover, then Unleaven Bread, then First Fruits, then Pentecost.  I'll give scripture in a minute to show this order.

Now the Apostles and dsiciples had just had Passover and Unleaven Bread, Unleaven Bread is mentioned specifically.  And now they were to count seven Sabbaths to know when Pentecost should be observed, as it is in scripture.  So they are counting Sabbaths.  Now back to Acts 20:6-7:

And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread,... And upon the first [day] of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread,... ...ready to depart on the morrow...

Now considering the Greek, And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread,... And upon one of the Sabbaths, when the disciples came together to break bread,... ...ready to depart on the morrow...

My explanation, they were counting Sabbaths between Unleaven Bread and Pentecost, and were observing both the Feasts and Sabbaths according to the Torahs instructions.  In fact consider this translation:

And we sailed forth after the days of unleavened from Philippi, and came to them in Troas up to five days; where we tarried seven days. And in one of the sabbaths, the disciples having been assembled together to break bread, Paul conversed with them being about to go forth the morrow; and he continued the word until midnight.  (Acts 20:6-7, SLT)

This verse does not teach that the Sabbath was changed to Sunday, but teaches exactly what the instructions of the Torah tell us to do.  I think because people have been ignorant of the Feasts and what they represent that they have decided through extra-biblical traditions that Sunday became the new Sabbath.  But in fact, it is only tradition that changed this.  The church in Acts was still observing Torah, as were the Apostles.

Now consider the Torah instructions:

And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, [Concerning] the feasts of the LORD, which ye shall proclaim [to be] holy convocations, [even] these [are] my feasts. Six days shall work be done: but the seventh day [is] the sabbath of rest, an holy convocation; ye shall do no work [therein]: it [is] the sabbath of the LORD in all your dwellings.

These [are] the feasts of the LORD, [even] holy convocations, which ye shall proclaim in their seasons. In the fourteenth [day] of the first month at even [is] the LORD'S passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month [is] the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread. In the first day ye shall have an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein. But ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD seven days: in the seventh day [is] an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work [therein]. And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, When ye be come into the land which I give unto you, and shall reap the harvest thereof, then ye shall bring a sheaf of the firstfruits of your harvest unto the priest: And he shall wave the sheaf before the LORD, to be accepted for you: on the morrow after the sabbath the priest shall wave it. And ye shall offer that day when ye wave the sheaf an he lamb without blemish of the first year for a burnt offering unto the LORD. And the meat offering thereof [shall be] two tenth deals of fine flour mingled with oil, an offering made by fire unto the LORD [for] a sweet savour: and the drink offering thereof [shall be] of wine, the fourth [part] of an hin. And ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn, nor green ears, until the selfsame day that ye have brought an offering unto your God: [it shall be] a statute for ever throughout your generations in all your dwellings.

And ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the sabbath, from the day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven sabbaths shall be complete: Even unto the morrow after the seventh sabbath shall ye number fifty days; and ye shall offer a new meat offering unto the LORD. Ye shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two tenth deals: they shall be of fine flour; they shall be baken with leaven; [they are] the firstfruits unto the LORD. And ye shall offer with the bread seven lambs without blemish of the first year, and one young bullock, and two rams: they shall be [for] a burnt offering unto the LORD, with their meat offering, and their drink offerings, [even] an offering made by fire, of sweet savour unto the LORD. Then ye shall sacrifice one kid of the goats for a sin offering, and two lambs of the first year for a sacrifice of peace offerings. And the priest shall wave them with the bread of the firstfruits [for] a wave offering before the LORD, with the two lambs: they shall be holy to the LORD for the priest. And ye shall proclaim on the selfsame day, [that] it may be an holy convocation unto you: ye shall do no servile work [therein: it shall be] a statute for ever in all your dwellings throughout your generations. And when ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of the corners of thy field when thou reapest, neither shalt thou gather any gleaning of thy harvest: thou shalt leave them unto the poor, and to the stranger: I [am] the LORD your God.  (Leviticus 23:1-22, KJV)

I'm convinced that Acts 20:6-7 is terribly misunderstood by most who read it because they are ignorant of the instructions in Leviticus.

Blessings.
Because the carnal mind [is] enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.  (Romans 8:7, KJV)

DiscipleHeLovesToo

i found this in the Companion Bible notes in e-sword, but don't know if i understand it; is it saying something similar?

first, &c. = first day of the sabbaths, i.e. the first day for reckoning the seven sabbaths to Pentecost. It depended upon the harvest (Deu_16:9), and was always from the morrow after the weekly sabbath when the wave sheaf was presented (Lev_23:15). In Joh_20:1 this was the fourth day after the Crucifixion, "the Lord's Passover. "Compare App-156. This was by Divine ordering. But in A.D. 57 it was twelve days after the week of unleavened bread, and therefore more than a fortnight later than in A.D. 29.

i know a little greek, but he runs a sandwich shop :); but i thought it might be interesting to you - i don't pretend to have an opinion, being largely ignorant of such detailed studies on Biblical greek

GLYB!!!
Joh 17:3  And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.

bill16652

Totally agree and is why we celebrate the feasts and recofnize that they are Gods and not Jewisha s such.  People always argue the Law or Jewishness but they fail to realize where our roots re and that we are to please God and what is laid out is Gods instructions not Jewsih customs.

Tallen

Amen, Bill.  I totally agree.  I am working on an article about the feast and how they were presented in creation.

Torah=YHWH's Instructions to his people.   :)
Because the carnal mind [is] enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.  (Romans 8:7, KJV)

Tallen

Quote from: DiscipleHeLovesToo on February 10, 2012, 07:52:06 pm
i found this in the Companion Bible notes in e-sword, but don't know if i understand it; is it saying something similar?

first, &c. = first day of the sabbaths, i.e. the first day for reckoning the seven sabbaths to Pentecost. It depended upon the harvest (Deu_16:9), and was always from the morrow after the weekly sabbath when the wave sheaf was presented (Lev_23:15). In Joh_20:1 this was the fourth day after the Crucifixion, "the Lord's Passover. "Compare App-156. This was by Divine ordering. But in A.D. 57 it was twelve days after the week of unleavened bread, and therefore more than a fortnight later than in A.D. 29.


Yes, it is essentially the same thing.  And note, "it was the fourth day after the crucifixion".  Which tells us a very important fact, fifty days later we'll find Pentecost, which we do.  Exactly as it should be.  BTW, I can only find one year in which the biblical record was fulfilled exactly in this order.  One has to be familiar with the feast and how this all works, and we can know the year of the Lord's death.
Because the carnal mind [is] enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.  (Romans 8:7, KJV)