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February 16, 2020, 03:28:28 pm

A rose by any other name ...

Started by Foadle, July 22, 2011, 08:14:28 am

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Foadle

 Okay, I am sure most, if not all of you have heard of Shakespeare's "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" but Biblically how true is this?

Words have power.  In fact we are told that life and death are in the power of the tongue (Pr 18:21).  God created the world by His words (Gen 1).

Throughout the Bible there are many references to God changing names.  Abram was changed to Abraham and Sarai to Sarah.  Jacob was changed to Israel.  In other places we see God stating what I child was to be called before they had even been born (or conceived in some cases): Ishmael, Isaac, John and Jesus.  These are but a few examples.

If names were unimportant then surely God would have no cause to tell parents what to name their baby or to change a person's name at a later stage in their life.

So question: how seriously should we consider name meanings?  And if a name (e.g. Jacob) is not good in meaning (it means supplanter or deceiver) should a person have it changed and how should they go about it (from a Biblical not natural perspective) if they do?

pastorzzub

I changed my name following a visit from an angel.

Pete

My name, Peter Michael, means "a God-like rock".  I think I'll keep it.  ;)


Way back in August 2008, lovesblessing started a thread asking the question "What's in a name?"

Good reading, if you've got the time.  ;)

O0
"There is no charge for awesomeness -- or attractiveness."

Foadle

Had a read.  Unfortunately my name is not one of those you beaut wonders that everyone would want.  It means weary in Hebrew and cow in Arabic.
My middle name means consecreated to God. what am I ... a sacrifice? :doh: Weary of being set apart for god :o I hate is more and more all the time

Supplanter

QuoteSo question: how seriously should we consider name meanings?  And if a name (e.g. Jacob) is not good in meaning (it means supplanter or deceiver) should a person have it changed and how should they go about it (from a Biblical not natural perspective) if they do?


My name is the french female derivative of Jacob and means just that. It can also mean God protects or heel-grabber. However, I don't see it as bad in meaning. We all serve a purpose. I very much fit my name. One definition I read of supplant was to replace things of lesser value. I do tend to be a bit destructive but sometimes things need destroying for something better to come in. But we should remember too that we will be given new names as well. But I don't see a name as a defining characteristic, rather that there is something in us that gives credence to the name.

pastorzzub

I can only tell my story.  My name was William, which is old English for warrior.

On my 20th birthday I was visited by an angel who told me that the church was full of warriors, but God was looking for a son who would truly grasp His nature as father and reflect the nature of the Father and the blessing of the son to the nations.

I was instructed to change my name to Benjamin, which is Hebrew for son of my right hand.

One year to the day I changed my name by deed poll, cost me 35 pounds with local solicitors to Benjamin.

DianeL

34
A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another.
35
By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another. John 13

Sarah

My first name means "Princess".  My middle name means "people of victory".   :hugegrin:   
We have "music/song" "God's promise". 
Also "gift of God" "who is like God".
They're pretty special. :adore:
Embraced by the loving arms of the Father....

Foadle

what you are saying covers another dilemma I have Zub.  Name changes in the Bible were based on the take over of a kingdom, either natural as in the case of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego (these were their new, Babylonian names); or spiritual as in the case of Abraham or Israel (the Kingdom of God had truly become what they were living for).  So it's a case of I don't believe I can just change my name.  Zub saw an angel and was given the instruction.  I sort of having a sensing that I should but if it were God a new name would be presented. 

pastorzzub

God doesn't just lead by the spectacular.  The still small voice of the Spirit is where He prefers to be.  If you have a sense, go with it.  If you are unclear on how ro proceed, pray in tongues until you know the next step.

DianeL

Strange thing sometimes, I get called 'Linda' very often and this isn't my name, and it works for me as Linda means 'Beautiful' and 'Excellent Virtue'.
:)
My name in iteself means 'Divine' and 'Glorious', with scripture Psalm 40:5 'Many, O Lord my God are your wonderful works which You have done. They are more than can be numbered'

This is out of 'The Name Book' - author Dorothy Astoria

Foadle - in this name book, your name means (Hebrew origin) 'Gazelle' and spiritual connotation 'Beauty and Grace' with scripture Psalm 18: 32-33

"It is God who arms me with strength, and makes my way perfect.  He makes my feet like the feet of deer, and sets me on my high places."

Oh, writing that scripture just gave me goosebumps on my arms :)



34
A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another.
35
By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another. John 13

Renee

THE DEFINITION OF REVIVAL

1. Falling in love with Jesus all over again

2. Having the Joy of your salvation restored

Foadle

I think I have heard that one before but in my searches on my name most places will have my name as being Hebrew meaning weary or Arabic meaning wild cow (or simply cow).  This site (http://www.abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Leah.html) gives an etymology of the name but this segment is the part dealing with meaning:

"The name Leah is identical to the verb Leah
(la'a) meaning to be weary, grieved, offended (even impatient or slow says BDB Theological Dictionary). HAW Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament sums the meaning of this verb up as, "physical or psychological weariness." It may occur to someone who runs with footmen (Jeremiah 12:5), or folks who vainly try to find a way into a house (Genesis 19:11). It may happen when water has a disagreeable taste (Exodus 7:18) or when a person is so lazy that the mere movement of bring food to his mouth wears him out (Proverbs 26:15).

A derivation of this verb is the word telaa(tela'a), toil, hardship (Exodus 18:8, Nehemiah 9:32).

Probably to complement the name Rachel (meaning Ewe) BDB Theological Dictionary and NOBS Study Bible Name List turn to the cognate Arabic and read Wild Cow. To a Hebrew audience, the name Leah may have resounded her position of grief and offense as she was Jacob's least loved wife."

I have seen one that described the name as delicate and weary.

Supplanter

Perhaps your name adequately reflects your struggle. That doesn't mean good cannot come. When God saw Leah was unloved, he opened her womb and gave her children, sons that in Jewish culture would be her redemption and who later became the majority of the 12 tribes of Israel. What a legacy she had. God loved Leah and didn't think ill of her.

DianeL

34
A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another.
35
By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another. John 13

pastorzzub

Not to mention that Jacob was buried with Leah.  She ended up his true love, despite his initial attitude.  Rachel died in childbirth a rebel to God.

Rachel Faith

Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins. 1 Peter 4:8

DiscipleHeLovesToo

just my opinion, but i think names meant something different in OT times; they were more of prophecies than they were labels; and every time someone called you by name you were reminded of the prophecy about you - faith comes by hearing.

today, names are merely labels for most people, so i don't think it really matters UNLESS you hear a meaning when you hear your name.

My first, middle, and last names have a number of different meanings; the ones i choose are "God is my judge" (really good for me since I'm under grace), "warrior's shield", and 'son of enthusiasm"  :hugegrin:

GLY!!!
Joh 17:3  And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent.

Inzl Kett

My real name I am keeping.  Rut--(more commonly rendered Ruth)--Friend of God. The meaning is a very deep. 
A firm believer in God's Word.  A skeptic on everything else.

Foadle

Quote from: DiscipleHeLovesToo on July 31, 2011, 02:35:35 pm
just my opinion, but i think names meant something different in OT times; they were more of prophecies than they were labels; and every time someone called you by name you were reminded of the prophecy about you - faith comes by hearing.

today, names are merely labels for most people, so i don't think it really matters UNLESS you hear a meaning when you hear your name. 


I would disagree with that.  God doesn't change and as it is in the spiritual realm that we are talking I believe that names are very important.  JMO.  Even if the name is prophetic it is not a prophecy I would want over my life.  Also I don't hear the meaning when I hear my name spoken but it doesn't change the fact that it is being spoken out, has meaning (whether or not I decide to recognise it) and therefore has power.

Quote from: DiscipleHeLovesToo on July 31, 2011, 02:35:35 pm
My first, middle, and last names have a number of different meanings; the ones i choose are "God is my judge" (really good for me since I'm under grace), "warrior's shield", and 'son of enthusiasm"  :hugegrin:

GLY!!!


At least you have meanings to your name that ycu can be proud of.